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Darlene E. Kelley
donkeyskid@webtv.net
April 24, 1999
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Historical Collections of Ohio                    
The Kelley Family Book
compiled by Hermon Alfred Kelley  1897    
And Then They Went West by D. Kelley  1998     (Part 9)
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Military ( con't )

Lincoln and
Dean returned to Kelley's Hall about midnight and reported that they
found no trace of fires, or foot tracks in the snow near Middle Island,
and that there was no danger to be apprehended from that quarter.  On
the following day, Mr.Stancel and D. K. Huntington were sent to
Put-in-Bay to obtain information, with instructions to proceed as far as
Point au Pele' Island, if  found necessary.  One of them returned that
evening and reported having met Mr. Price of " Pelee" Island who had
told them that there was no army on the island, nor had there been any.
Mr. Price evidently was considered a reliable authority.  On receipt of
this report, the guards were called in, and the company dismissed.  It
had been under arms from January 15th to 22nd inclusive.  This was not
their first experience in camp for they had spent a week in drill at
Toledo encampment in Sept.,1863.  Soon after this, at the request of
Colonel Smith, in command of the United States army post in Detroit,
Captain Webb detailed Hamilton Hays and Morris Lincoln to follow a gang
of thirty rebels who had crossed the ice at Detroit.  During the absence
of Hays and Lincoln, Captain Webb went to Sandusky.  During his absence
from the island, another message arrived from Colonel Smith stating that
a rumor had reached him that the rebels had concealed a cannon on the
Canadian shore and that he had already sent three different men who had
been unsuccessful in their search for it. However, he wanted a further
search to be made by some one from the island.  On the return of Hays
and Lincoln, Hays was set across the ice to Canada and Lincoln returned
to Detroit.  Hamilton Hays must have been a man of exceptional
qualificaions for the work, for he was successful in locating the
cannon.  His report was forwarded to the United States authorities in
Washington who took up the matter with the Canadian government with the
result that the gun was seized and dismounted.  It seems that Hays found
the gun mounted on board a small sailing vessel, the schooner Montreal
of Kingston.  She had a crew of sixteen men, who professed to be wood
choppers awaiting the opening of navigation to go up the lakes. A tale
that was manifestly absurd.  Hays was offered a job but refused, and
returned as fast as possible to the island with his report, which was
sent by Captain Webb to General Terry by whom it was sent to General
Hinzelman in command of the department of Ohio, who sent it to the
United States Secretary of War at Washington and within ten days, the
vessel was taken possession of and the men arrested by the Canadian
authorities. On April 24,1864, Fredrick Kelley died.  He was a member of
Company E and on Monday, April 25th, he was buried, the company
attending the funeral in uniform.  The first sad ceremony for the
company. On this same day, orders came for the company to join the
United States army for one hundred days' service.  Great excitement
ensued on the island, for there was some unwillingness on a part of a
number of the company to leave the island unprotected in case of a rebel
raid from Canada.  Orders came on May1,1864, for the company to report
at Sandusky on the following day at 10:00 A.M. On May 2nd, about sixty
members of Company " E" went to Sandusky and were quartered temporarily
in the mayor's office and commercial rooms in nearby buildings.  No
better idea can be given of the events of the succeeding days than to
quote from the diaries of Jerry Dean and George Bristol.  Mr Dean, May
3rd Tuesday; "Great excitement in the company about substitutes and the
duce to pay all around. No rations furished yet. Plenty of grumblers
about."  Dean , May 4th Wenesday; " No orders received for the Battalion
to do anything yet.  Wife came over to town. I went home on the Gazzelle
after Queen left. --Bristol, May 4th " In Sandusky all day, first drill.
When  Queen went back I bid good bye to wife."  Dean, May 5th--" I went
back to Sandusky on Queen in morning," Bristol, May 6th "Received orders
this P.M. for Battalion to go to Camp Chase Columbus next Monday. Leave
for home in morning."        Dean,May 7th; " The company went home on
steamer Parsons this A.M. Met the Queen near Marblehead and took off ten
men returning from furlough. Two days' rations ordered for Monday
morning."  Bristol--May 7th; " Came home on the steamer Parsons, at home
all day. Order came to detach the company from13 Battalion."  May 8th
--"At home all day" The company remained on Kelley's Island until the
20th. On this date the company was sent to Johnson's Island and was
mustered in for 100 days or less, pitching their tents on the west end.
The island was utilized as a site for a prison for officers of the
Southern Army.  Every effort was made to fill the company, a bounty fund
had been raised and bounties were paid to outside men to fill the
vacancy of 100 men. In the meantime it was represented to Mr. Bristol
that as Webb was a much older man and had been the companies Captain for
a long time, it would be the proper thing for him to him to resign his
position in favor of Mr. Webb, which he did accordingly on May 25th
Captain Webb enlisted as first Lieutenant of the company.  Everybody
hoped that the company would be flled to its quota, in which event, the
officers were to be the same as they had been on the island with a few
minor exceptions.  In the meantime, Mr. Bristol and Mr. Lang remained on
the island awaiting developments.  On May 28th they returned to
Johnson's Island. Ninteen more men joined the company that day but still
it was short its full number.  On May 29th the company was filled and
Bristol and Lang joined the company taking their old rank of 1st and 2nd
Lieutenants, while Webb assumed the Captaincy, as before.  The company
remained on Johnson's Island awaiting orders until Monday June 6th when
they started for Washington and the front, as Company K--130th Regiment
O. N. I.  Before they left, the steamer Gazelle arrived with many
relatives and friends to bid the men farewell. It is not my purpose to
follow the fortunes of the company at the front.  Suffice it to say that
they were under fire a greater part of the time near Petersburg at the
seige of Richmond and when their time was up, the regiment the company
was in, was sent to Toledo to be mustered out.  They arrived there
September 12th.  The company was kept in camp awaiting the arrival of
the mustering officer and paymaster.  On Saturday September 17th the
Regiment was furloughed till the following Monday and about 30 of the
Island men started for home.  They left on the 4:40 P.M. train and
arrived in Sundusky at 8:00 P.M. and left in a sailboat for the Island,
where they arrived about midnight.  Sunday was spent very happily and
the men were ready to start to Toledo on Monday.  When the Queen
arrived,she brought a telegram stating that the Company would be
mustered out on Tuesday.  At six P.M. Monday September 19th, the men
boarded the Island Queen bound for Toledo---arriving at Middle Bass, she
landed at the Wherle dock along side the Steamer Parsons.  No sooner was
the Queen made fast than she was boarded by a company of about
thirty-five men, whose leader demanded immediate surrender.  Taken
completely by  surprise and having no weapons of defense, there was
nothing to do but to submit quietly.  After being held aboard the Queen
for an hour or two, the men were allowed to go ashore and soon after,
the two boats departed.  The Parsons had been captured by this same
company, most of whom, boarded her at Amherstburg on the Detroit River,
where the Parsons had stopped for passengers.  The boats disappeared in
the darkness. The Queen was scuttled and sank in shoal waters not far
from the Bass Islands, on Chick-a-no-lee-reef.  The Parsons proceeded to
Sandusky Bay, where the rebels hoped to capture the U.S. gunboat
Michigan which lay anchor near the Rebel prison on Johnson's Island.  A
plot had been made to drug the Michigan's crew,so as to render them
helpless to defend themselves.  But this was discovered in time and the
Michigan's Commander warned, so that when the Parsons arrived off the
mouth of Sandusky Bay about midnight, the signals that the rebels had
agreed upon were not made. Becoming suspicious that their plans had gone
amiss, the raiders turned the Parsons toward Detroit and crowed her at
full speed, probably expecting pursuit by the Michigan.  The Parsons was
abandoned in the Detroit River and the Rebels escaped into Canada.
Burleigh was captured later, being extradited from Canada and taken to
Cleveland for trial, but for some reason, was sent to Detroit for
imprisionment, where he escaped into Canada and eventually to England,
he lived until 1914.  His second in command, Captain Beall was captured
later, while attempting to blow up a railroad bridge near Buffalo.  He
was hung. Beall has been generally regarded to have been the leader of
the party.  But let us return to the men at Middle Bass. On Tuesday
morning, September 20th, at day break they went across the bay from
Middle Bass to Put-in Bay and after dinner, sailed for Kelley's Island
on the sloop Gazelle, with a large number of men and women.  On
Wednesday September 21st at 4:00 P.M. the men again started for Toledo ,
going to Sandusky on the tug General Burnside and by train to Toledo
where they arrived at 9:00 P.M. On September 22nd the company was
mustered out and most of them left for the Island on the sloop Coral.
Lieutenant Lang remained in Toledo to draw the pay for the company.  In
the meantime the Island Queen and had been raised and taken to Sandusky
for repairs.  The fate of the Parsons was not known for several days and
she was daily expected at the islands to make a raid upon them.  The
excitement ran high and valuables were secreted again.  Every steamboat
that approached the island, filled them with fear until her peaceful
character became certain.  It was thought at the time, that the Parsons
would make other captures and possibly a fleet of rebel commanded ships
would raid the shores of Lake Erie.  Imagine their relief, when
authentic news of the Parsons arrived.  Dean's diary says:"on Sunday
afternoon September 25th,1864, the Queen came from Sandusky for the
first time since repairing the rebel damages.  Captain Webb and Lt. Lang
arrived home.

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