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Darlene E. Kelley
donkeyskid@webtv.net
April 24, 1999
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Historical Collections of Ohio                    
The Kelley Family Book
compiled by Hermon Alfred Kelley  1897    
And Then They Went West by D. Kelley  1998     (Part 5)
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Early Settlers

An important addition was made to the population of the island in 1838
with the arrival of Mr. George C. Huntington with his wife and infant
son Erastus.  He had previously resided in Cleveland, where he met
Emeline, daughter of Datus Kelley, and married her, Nov 7th,1837.  They
resided in Cleveland until after the birth of Erastus, who was born
August 18th,1838.  In George Huntington, Charles Carpenter and William
S. Webb, Datus Kelley had three sons-in-law who were men of exceptional
abilities.  They were outstanding characters on the island and
contributed largely to the development of the island resources, as will
be seen further on in this history.  In 1839, John Titus arrived and
made a material addition to the population by bringing a large family of
unmarried children, besides being followed by several sons-in-law soon
after.  He had been preceded by his eldest son-in-law, Jesse E.
Woodford, who, as earlier stated, was there in 1837 helping to build
Addison Kelley's house, but settled on the island later.  Next to the
Kelley family, the Titus family was the most numerous on the island.
His sons-in-law were Edmund Ward, Joseph Lincoln, Sylvester S. Dwelle,
James Watkins, James Hamililton, and J. E. Woodford.  His younger sons,
Jared and James, also in due time, did their part in increasing the
population.  The first to buy land, after Addison Kelley were Horace
Kelley and Bernard McGettigan, in 1838; Patrick Martin, John Titus, J.E.
Woodford and James Hamilton, in 1839; Julius Kelley. George Kelley and
G.C. Huntington, 1842, in the order named.  The remainder of Datus' sons
received deeds in 1848 to 1851 and Irad's sons, Edwin and Charles
Kelley, in 1848 .  It would be interesting to know the names of the
sixty-eight persons who were on the island in 1840, but it seems
impossible at this date to learn them all, nor who arrived subsequent to
that date and when, except from the record of the town clerks, in which
we find them faithfully recorded, begining with the first elections of
the newly township of Kelleys Island, which was established as such by
an act of the Ohio Legislature January 21st 1840, as a result of a
petition sent by the Islanders  to Columbus.  The names of all the
voters on that occasion,and for each year subsequent to that date, until
1853, are recorded in the clerk's book. I quote from that ancient record
book as follows: "Pursuant to notice being regularly given, the electors
of Kelley's Island met on the first Monday in April 1840, at the school
house on said island and proceeded to organize said township by choosing
Walter Beardsley, Chester Stocking, and Ephriam T. Smith judges of the
election, and George C. Huntington and Addison Kelley clerks, who being
duly qualified, the election was declared open between the hours of 8
and 11 of said day, at which time and place the electors proceeded to
vote for township office.  The whole number of votes pulled was 15.  For
trustees, Addison Kelley had thirteen votes, Elmer Emory had fourteen
and Walter Beardsley had fifteen votes and were duly elected.  For
Treasurer-- Horace Kelley had fourteen votes-- For township clerk--Datus
Kelley had thirteen votes-- For overseers of the poor--John Titus and
Hezekiah Becksford had twelve votes each. For Fence Viewers--Chester
Stocking received twelve and George Wires and Henry Provost eleven
votes.  For Constable--Joseph Willet received fouteen votes. For
Supervisor of Highways--Henry Harris received twelve votes. Each of
which are duly elected.  Each of the above named township officers have
taken an oath to fulfill the duties prescribed to them according to law.
Horace Kelley has given bonds as Treasurer and Joseph Willet as
constable.  An election was also had for county Officers for the new
county of Ottawa and returns duly made to the temporary seat of Justice
at Port Clinton.  May,1840--Datus Kelley".  It is seen that the only men
not elected to some office of the fifteen voters were Ephraim T. Smith
and George C. Huntington. However on the sixth of April, five days
later, an election was held for the purpose of choosing a justice of
peace. George C Huntington was elected to that office with fourteen of
the fifteen votes cast.  He propably voted for Henry Harris, who
received one vote.  At this electon there was one more elector, Theodore
Morgan.  The year of 1840 was an epochal year for the island.  As we
have seen the erection of a township with a new name, Its first election
and it become an organized community.  It ceased  to be a paternal
govenment, although Datus Kelley's influence was doubtless little
lessened by the change.  The islanders were actively engaged in various
pursuits of farming, wood cutting, commercial fishing, and quarrying.
While it is true that Datus brought the peach tree and grape vine to the
island and demonstrated the suitability of both the soil and climate of
the locality for these fruits, it is a true fact that the farmers of the
island directed thier first agricultural efforts to raising wheat, and
in this they were remarkably sucessful, and for some years paid little
attention to horticulture. It was not until smut and the Hessian
fly,or,as they then said, " The Midge", ruined the wheat crops, that
they paid attention seriously to raising fruits.  In the 1841 election.
the results were several changes in officers, but there were only eleven
votes cast.  Other new names appear on the list however.  That of
Patrick Martin, Jacob Hay and James Estes, but Hay had been on the
island since 1836. In 1842, the number of votes cast rose  to eighteen.
The new names appearing on the poll book were Erastus D. Scott. Horace
Scott, Adam Bixbee, Lucius Dean and Jessie E. Woodford.  Mr. Woodford,
who originally settled at Plaster Bed on the upper Sandusky Bay, had in
1839 obtained a contract from the Kelleys for 58.25 acres on the east
sho
re at Barnum's Point now at this writing called Woodford's Point, where
he built a substancial house. In 1843 there were three new names
recorded They were Ezra McCallister, Jonathon Smith, and Rais Sperry.
In this year, Mr Charles Carpenter arrived on the island.  He was a
distant cousin of Mr George C. Huntington. His mother being Mary
Huntington. In this year Datus Kelley started to build a new home which
was located on lot six on the northeast coner of Division street and
Water Street overlooking the lake and staemboat dock.  At this time,
this was the most pretentious dwelling house on the island.  It was two
stories high and was framed of Oak and Cedar and mortised and pinned in
true New England style.  There were not enough men on the island to "
raise " it, so some sailors brought tackle from a ship that was loading
there and assisted in the raising.  Mr carpenter who was then courting
Caroline Kelley was doubtless glad to assist ( as he did) his
prospective father-in -law in constructing the house.  It was not
completed until the spring.  Mr. John Dean also assisted in the
construction.  Between the years of 1844 and 1846, new names appeared on
the records. they were as follows;  Charles M. Verguson, Edmund Ward,
William S Webb, Levi Thompson,and John Dean.

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