Back

Darlene E. Kelley
donkeyskid@webtv.net                              
May 21, 1999
***********************************************
Historical Collections of Ohio
The Kelley Family Book compiled by Hermon Alfred Kelley   1897   
And Then They Went West
by Darlene E. Kelley    1998   
***********************************************

    The name selected for the paper, is the same as that of the first
steamboat that was built on the Island shore.  Mr. W.D. Kelley carried
out the Nautical Idea in his editorial which he wrote for the opening
number of Volume 4.  It is given complete as follows:  " The good ship
Islander, having made three sucessful voyages, is now just setting out
on her fourth cruise.  The most of her crew being stockholders, and
having trusted their fortunes in her before and found it to be a good
investment, can cheerfully recommend the enterprise to all who wish to
take stock or passage.  Her timbers are of the true Loyal Oak, with not
a dozy streak of secession sap in her whole frame.  She now spreads her
canvas to the breeze of public opinion, very light at first, with scarce
force enough to move the heavy hulk from under the ice of the port where
she has been so long moored; but gradually, it is hoped,as on the other
trips, she will make increased way, as the broad sea of thought becomes
ruffled with her bow, and the high headlands ofsummer gaiety and the
promontories of speculation are left in the distance.  Sailor like, all
we ask is motion; give us but a breeze; if ahead, we will work against
it; if fair, then all the better; but of all things th most to be
dreaded is a dead calm--an indifference-- a lull, in the mental
atmosphere, which while it lasts, throws a pall of gloom over our little
community, and produces a feeling of unprofitableness to pervade that
portion of our existence  --
oppressive monotony. in the midst of which even a sudden squall of anger
seems an agreeable change.  Each sailor, a stockholder, has some little
package of Love, some good word of cheer, some idea on the bills of
lading, shipped from some port of plenty, to consigees who are in want
of the article, and by return packet, he will receive in exchange, its
equivelent in a commodity of foreign production.  The commercial laws,
which control the carrying business of thought between social
communities and individuals, as naturally tend toward safety and
realiability as to the mode of carrying, as does our National or State
laws, in exacting the inspection of steamboats, before receiving
passegers. Now the Islander has been thoroughly inspected by the proper
authorities, pronouncd seaworthy, nd is licensed to carry the most
valuable cargoes of thought that the rarest intellect may entrust to her
care.  Special attention will be paid to packages of Wit, that they be
damaged by sarcasm or vulgarity.  The delicious and tender clusters of
Morality,as well as the chinaware of Politics, shall be handled with
care, and shipped at our risk ' the perils of navigation only,
excepted.'  Religion, as usual carried without charge and allowed rhe
freedom of the ship, to pit down Sin,provided that it in no way
interferes with the Sinners.  Foreign correspondance and soldiers'
letters are rated as first class freight and gladly received.  The rifle
and blasting powder of personal animosity is contraband, and is to be
thrown overboard as soon as found.  The Fat Man's, ( A.S. Kelley)
valuable services have been engaged to ballast our ship with articles
from his pen, keeping her aways in trim and advised in regard to the
state of the markets, progress of military events, etc.  In conclusion
to our prospectus, we wish to advise all those having a valuable thought
of transportation. a thought that belongs to the world and not to an
individual alone, to label it to the Islander and not send it afloat on
the oppositon line of gossip; which on account of her light draft, runs
into all the little ports of afternoon tea parties and in proportion to
her shallowness, render unseaworthy and unsafe to all on board. The
public may have no apprehension of pirates,for as yet there have no
long, black raksh crafts been discovered in this sea of literature, that
is in any way formidable to our 'Forty Rod Swamp Angels' which are
always on hand with their muzzle to the ports  and woe to the Audacious
Rebel that dare come within range of the grape."
*********************************************** 

Back